Original Research

An inventory of ethnoveterinary knowledge for chicken disease control in Soroti district, Uganda

Gerald Zirintunda, John Kateregga, Sarah Nalule, Patrick Vudriko, Savino Biryomumaisho, James O. Acai
Journal of Medicinal Plants for Economic Development | Vol 8, No 1 | a248 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/jomped.v8i1.248 | © 2024 Gerald Zirintunda, John Kateregga, Sarah Nalule, Patrick Vudriko, Savino Biryomumaisho, James O. Acai | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 14 February 2024 | Published: 18 April 2024

About the author(s)

Gerald Zirintunda, Department of Veterinary Pharmacy and Comparative Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biosecurity, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda Department of Animal Production and Management, Faculty of Agriculture and Animal Sciences, Busitema University, Tororo, Uganda
John Kateregga, Department of Veterinary Pharmacy and Comparative Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biosecurity, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda
Sarah Nalule, Department of Veterinary Pharmacy and Comparative Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biosecurity, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda
Patrick Vudriko, Department of Veterinary Pharmacy and Comparative Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biosecurity, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda
Savino Biryomumaisho, Department of Veterinary Pharmacy and Comparative Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biosecurity, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda
James O. Acai, Department of Veterinary Pharmacy and Comparative Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biosecurity, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda

Abstract

Background: Knowledge regarding the use of ethnoveterinary products in the control of chicken diseases in Uganda is hardly documented.

Aim: The study documented the ideas of controlling chicken diseases using herbal remedies as shared by chicken owners.

Setting: The study was conducted among backyard and free-ranging chicken owners.

Methods: Mixed methods of focus group discussions (FGDs) and farmer questionnaires were used.

Results: Most respondents, 91% (71/78), were using ethnoveterinary medicine (EVM) and 96.2% (75/78) knew others who were also using them. Of the respondents, 82% (64/78) were convinced that EVMs are effective alternative to conventional treatments. Ethnoveterinary medicines are acceptable and promoted during informal and formal training. The sources of EVM were home gardens, wild sources and markets. Most respondents had their planted EVM materials and acquired knowledge from neighbours and friends. About 37.2% (29/78) of the respondents affirmed that they could not freely share their EVM knowledge with others.

Conclusion: The participants of the FGDs and the respondents of the questionnaires knew the acceptable opportunities of alternative drugs of unproven efficacy and safety. The practices pose risks to chickens and the possible development of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in chickens and humans. The study shows the need for claim validations to guide the safe use of EVM in chicken.

Contribution: The study documents plant materials for treating various chicken diseases. The information is essential in the era of AMR and among communities that cannot afford drugs.


Keywords

herbal; Newcastle disease; coccidiosis; preparation; adverse effects; drugs

JEL Codes

A12: Relation of Economics to Other Disciplines; D13: Household Production and Intrahousehold Allocation; D14: Household Saving • Personal Finance; P28: Natural Resources • Energy • Environment

Sustainable Development Goal

Goal 1: No poverty

Metrics

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